Kalkaster grandparents

The bird’s nest fern is more common in the garden (in mild climates) than as a houseplant, but given its predilection for mild temperatures, there is no excuse to find a place for it at home. The slenderness and sobriety of its leaves is tremendously decorative.

 

A FEW BRIEF NOTES ON ASPLENIUM NIDUS AVIS

Native species of the Australian jungles. Naturally, it is not widely distributed around the world. We can find it in the wild outside of Oceania in some parts of Africa and on islands in the Pacific. In their natural habitat they reach very considerable heights and diameters of up to 2 or 3 meters. They are usually found associated with trees that support them without parasitizing them. This ensures the plant suitable shade conditions for its development.

The shape of its leaves allows water to be collected and carried to the central area of ​​the plant, ensuring optimal water supply. The name of Asplenium nidus avis is not a coincidence if we look at the central part of the plant (see photo).

Central part of the Asplenium nidus avis
Photo by: Kevin Law

NEEDS AS A HOUSEPLANT

LIGHT

One of the most important things to ensure good growth. Keep it gloomy. It’s a fern and that says it all. It is an indoor plant that we can place in north-facing areas of the house. In a study, office or even in a bathroom (as long as it has a window). It tolerates direct light a little but discolors the leaves.

TEMPERATURE

Another aspect to take into account in the location of the plant. You need the normal temperatures of a home. The normal range is between 15 and 25. The more stable the temperature, the more comfortable the plant will be. We will avoid cold air currents. Being a fern, humidity is important so we will avoid heat sources in winter that dry out the environment too much. Spray the leaves with water from time to time. In summer we can take it outside in a shady area.

IRRIGATION

Abundant but with good drainage and without flooding. The frequencies will go from being weekly in winter to 2-3 days during summer. In the middle months, adjust the frequency to 4 or 5 days. Ambient humidity is important. If the outer container or saucer is filled with wet pebbles, expanded clay balls, or gravel, we will increase the humidity around the plant.

SUBSTRATUM

It must have an adequate organic matter content. Add some peat or mulch to the mix with some drainage.

MOST COMMON PROBLEMS

  • Trying to polish the sheets will cause them to darken and turn ugly.
  • If water collects in the saucer , it is relatively easy for molds to appear that will kill the plant.
  • Avoid puddling of the substrate.
  • If the edges of the leaves darken and dry, it means that the environment is too warm so move it to darker and cooler areas.

REPRODUCTION OF ASPLENIUM NIDUS AVIS

We have little to say. It reproduces by the spores on the underside of the leaves and also germination occurs in very very specific environmental conditions so it is somewhat difficult.

Welcome to The GardenPure! My name is Ryan Heagle, and I’m the founder of The GardenPure, I spent the first part of my adult life teaching and then living in Australia in various business ventures, the first of which was a business devoted to the sale of house plants.  I am now a full time blogger. I am a self taught gardener.

Ryan Heagle

Welcome to The GardenPure! My name is Ryan Heagle, and I’m the founder of The GardenPure, I spent the first part of my adult life teaching and then living in Australia in various business ventures, the first of which was a business devoted to the sale of house plants.  I am now a full time blogger. I am a self taught gardener.

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