Characteristics and cultivation of the horse chestnut

Today, in Gardenprue, we have to talk about a tree, yes, as we have said, impressive. It is the gigantic horse chestnut that we can see in many gardens (botanical or urban), and in alignments of walks, generating a great cozy shade in the summer season.

We will know everything necessary for its cultivation.

THE HORSE CHESTNUT, AN IMPRESSIVE TREE FOR AN IMPRESSIVE GARDEN

Its scientific name is  Aesculus hippocastanum  and it belongs to the Sapindáceas family. A perhaps unknown family to which it also belongs more or less common species such as the maple  (and all the species that this genus encompasses). It can reach a size of 30 meters and we can see it in large gardens or parks, as in the photo above we see that they are used for alignment.

Today, the horse chestnut is acclimated to temperate climates , although its origin is in the Balkan area.

CLIMATIC CHARACTERISTICS

As we have commented before, it is a typical tree of the temperate zone. That is, its cultivation is indicated for cold areas (northern and central Europe, the United States, etc.). It is a species that resists cold very well , even untimely frosts.

SOIL CONDITIONS

For its cultivation you need a soil that houses moisture for a long time . A fresh soil with good drainage capacity. Texture is indifferent for horse chestnut as long as the level of moisture and organic matter is appropriate.

If you grow a horse chestnut in moist, nutrient-rich soil, it will grow very fast.

IRRIGATION AND FERTILIZER NEEDS

The procedure for watering horse chestnut is easy. The only premise that we have to respect is that the soil is suitably moist. It is not worth flooding or watering copiously since half of the water will percolate and will not be available.

As for the subscriber , if it is a young specimen you can add a little organic matter around the trunk, especially in the vegetative growth season.

The horse chestnut will appreciate it. Once they grow and become large specimens, it is not so necessary to make this contribution of organic matter , but as they always say, it is very useful for their development.

HORSE CHESTNUT MULTIPLICATION

We have 2 options to produce new plants of this species. On the one hand we have a multiplication by seeds, a bit complicated since it is necessary to stratify them (keeping them in the refrigerator for a few months when they are collected).

Otherwise, they lose their germination ability quickly. If you have tried to germinate the horse chestnut and have not been able to, you can also resort to cutting.

ITS ACTIVE PRINCIPLES ARE USED IN MEDICINE

Although it seems that almost all plants have a specific function (either pharmacological or medicinal), it seems that the horse chestnut is no exception. Drugs are made from its compounds to reduce the viscosity of the blood.

It is therefore a vasoprotector with anti-inflammatory properties.

As for its medicinal compounds, it is capable of reducing the inflammation of varicose veins, hemorrhoids, edema, etc.

And that is all we have to say about Aesculus hippocastanum , although before finishing this article, we are going to establish a summary of all that has been discussed.

  • Climate : resistant to cold and frost. Mild weather.
  • Soil : cool, well drained and moist.
  • Irrigation and fertilization : keep the soil moist. It requires little subscriber.
  • Multiplication : by seeds (stratification) or cutting.

Welcome to The GardenPure! My name is Ryan Heagle, and I’m the founder of The GardenPure, I spent the first part of my adult life teaching and then living in Australia in various business ventures, the first of which was a business devoted to the sale of house plants.  I am now a full time blogger. I am a self taught gardener.

Ryan Heagle

Welcome to The GardenPure! My name is Ryan Heagle, and I’m the founder of The GardenPure, I spent the first part of my adult life teaching and then living in Australia in various business ventures, the first of which was a business devoted to the sale of house plants.  I am now a full time blogger. I am a self taught gardener.

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