Ficus lyrata: keys to growing this indoor plant

Normally when a houseplant causes surprise to see it, it is due to the colorful, large and / or exotic flowering. The fact that an indoor plant stands out especially for its green foliage is often in the background. The same does not happen with the Ficus lyrata , which we are talking about today since its majestic, smooth and large leaves are the ones that surprise when you look at it. Today in Gardenprue, we know the Ficus lyrata as a houseplant .

FICUS LYRATA , A GREAT FOLIAGE FOR THE INTERIOR

Coming from Africa, this peculiar fig-like ficus can be a great companion in large and tall rooms. Many times the scientific name is placed in honor of the person who names the plant but other times it is due to the color, shape or area of ​​origin.

The name lyrata refers to lyra, the Latin name of the instrument we all know, the lyre. The vast majority of current string instruments have a shape very similar in their resonance boxes to the ficus lyrata leaf . If I show you the shape of a leaf, doesn’t it remind you of the shape of a violin or the like?

Although the Ficus lyrata will not delight us with great classic pieces, if we take proper care of it the delight will be visual.

FICUS LYRATA GROWING AND CARE GUIDE

As usual, in the indoor plants that we have, all their care is based on 4 basic pillars.

  • Temperatures
  • Exposure to light
  • Irrigation
  • Substratum

IDEAL TEMPERATURES FOR THE CARE OF THIS FICUS

Ficus are generally plants / trees that do not have a wide range of endurance temperatures . They are of warm climate where they can be planted outdoors without problems. The adult specimens come to withstand cold temperatures from time to time. At home it is easy to maintain its optimal growth requirements at normal temperatures. By not falling below 15-18ºC we will be giving it the optimum.

LIGHT AND NECESSARY LUMINOSITY OF FICUS LYRATA

Like the vast majority of indoor plants, they do not like direct sun but they do like good lighting. Therefore it must be sieved.

SUBSTRATE TO GET THE MOST OUT OF IT GROWN IN A POT

The soil needs are nothing out of the ordinary. Soils with a good humus content are preferable. It needs good drainage. As you can see, nothing out of the ordinary. Substrates composed of peat or mulch combined with a small part of sand (always from the river) to give it some drainage is more than enough.

CHARACTERISTICS OF THE IRRIGATIONS OF THE INDOOR FICUS

The risks are normal. Spaced around a week in winter and somewhat more frequently in summers. To avoid possible excess water (which are fatal), it is advisable to let the substrate dry between watering and watering since this plant withstands drought better than excess humidity. Better to sin from lack of irrigation than otherwise.

In summer you may need some water spray to calm the stresses, both for the plant and the caretaker 😉

It is a plant widely used in bright, very spacious and tall spaces, acquiring the appearance of a small indoor tree rather than a plant.

POSSIBLE PROBLEMS WITH FICUS LYRATA

  • If the leaves become limp, the Ficus lyrata will be asking you for water. Still, check the substrate because if it is wet, the diagnosis may be different.
  • If the leaves do fall it could be drafts or low light so act accordingly.
  • Yellow spots on the upper side of the leaf accompanied by small cobwebs on the back are a red spider symptom that must be treated.
  • If the leaves turn yellow it means an excess of watering.
  • Sometimes, if the growth is optimal, it may be necessary to train it to help the trunk grow upright.

Welcome to The GardenPure! My name is Ryan Heagle, and I’m the founder of The GardenPure, I spent the first part of my adult life teaching and then living in Australia in various business ventures, the first of which was a business devoted to the sale of house plants.  I am now a full time blogger. I am a self taught gardener.

Ryan Heagle

Welcome to The GardenPure! My name is Ryan Heagle, and I’m the founder of The GardenPure, I spent the first part of my adult life teaching and then living in Australia in various business ventures, the first of which was a business devoted to the sale of house plants.  I am now a full time blogger. I am a self taught gardener.

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