The alarming tinder of the vine

STEREUM HISUTUM & CO, LA YESCA DE LA VID O PARALIS

From the previous title, it looks more like an American company than the scientific name of some of the fungi involved in this disease, known as tinder or paralis . We have also put “Co” because, without a doubt, there are more fungi involved in the development of this problem. We are going to comment on some interesting things about this problem.

Although the most important and mentioned fungus of tinder would be Stereum hisutum  (hence its prominence), when a sample is passed through the laboratory we discover other fungi that make an appearance:

  • Phaemoniella chlamidospora
  • Cylindrocarpon sp
  • Botryosphaeria obtusa
  • Fomitiporia speckled 

WHAT IS THE VINE TINDER ASSOCIATED WITH?

The tinder is known since ancient times. It is not a modern or recently discovered disease. It is a disease that is transmitted from pruning tools and that develops inside the vine, in the vascular system. This makes it very difficult to get to control the presence of the disease.

As it is related to the circulation of sap , tinder appears and disappears according to the stage of the crop or the needs, making an appearance when the crop requires a lot of water and is in a situation of stress.

This makes old strains more susceptible to disease development. A fact that maybe you did not know. It is called tinder in relation to fire, since the affected vines were cut and used as wood. Curious, right?

WHAT ARE YOUR SYMPTOMS?

The tinder is relatively easy to detect disease. This is so because the symptoms are shown in all the organs. If the disease is in an advanced stage, we will visually find problems in leaves, fruits, shoots, wood, shoots, etc.

Leaf affected by tinder. Source: Ingenieríalamancha

As a curiosity to tell you that these problems are observed the most is when the vine  is in a critical period. This may be, for example, when it has the greatest water needs or when it needs the greatest demand for food.

The first manifestations appear on the leaves (almost always suddenly), with desiccation that goes from the ends to the base of the leaf, as if they were burns, with the exception that they do not advance on the nerves of the leaf.

As we have said, the bunches are also affected. With an advanced tinder we observe violet colorations in the epidermis or drying the grapes in critical conditions.

What is clear is that, being a vascular disease , it affects the circulation of sap in the plant, in a downward direction. That is, we can have one arm of the vine affected, and another not. By preventing the passage of sap, the tissue dies and becomes unproductive. In fact, if we cut the culture transversely, we will see a necrotic tissue where little sap circulates (if it does).

This results in loss of harvest and quality of the grape.

LET’S BE CLEAR, PREVENTION OR CURE?

We find ourselves with a disease that, to this day, has no cure. There are specific treatments to reduce the problem, and day after day, new products are released that improve the health of the crop. However, it is bold to say that when faced with a major tinder problem, we can achieve 100% cure.

The strategy is more about prevention or remediation . As for prevention, it has a lot to say how we carry out the pruning of the vine and what instruments we use. Why?

The tinder penetrates through the wounds caused by the forced pruning that we carry out on the vine. In addition, the capacity to infest new healthy crops is great, since we use cutting tools that can harbor spores of the fungi involved in the development of this disease.

As prevention, in any case, we must use healing or fungicidal products, so that we “close the doors” to the entry of this disease. There are products that spray healing elements or paints that we can apply on the wounds caused by pruning.

If we already have an affected crop, the strategy goes through remediation . There are some techniques to slow the progression of the disease. Let’s see them.

  • Opening the cross of the stock and placing a wedge to improve the aeration of the interior (because anaerobic fungi do not develop under oxygen conditions).
  • Prune the strains that are affected last to prevent the spread of tinder.
  • Mark the affected strains and eliminate, if necessary (always considering the economic point of view).

With the opening of the cross the development of anaerobic fungi is avoided
Source: Comprarvinoecologico

STRATEGIES TO CONTROL / REDUCE THE DISEASE

IS THERE A SOLUTION IF WE HAVE A STRAIN AFFECTED BY TINDER?

The strategy to control the disease is to eliminate all the affected parts of the strain and leave those that are considered healthy.

This is complicated since tinder is a vascular disease  and it is not possible to know exactly how far it has advanced.

The pruned remains that we create are affected must be removed. It is not worth leaving them on the ground and letting them pass. Over time, it will serve as a host and with good environmental conditions, enough spores can be generated to infect other strains.

As a curiosity, if we look at the Ministry of Agriculture for a product authorized for tinder, we will find some, however, we find the following reference:

Inject using special equipment at a depth of 20-40 cm. 4-5 l. of this broth to each diseased strain (with less than 50% attack) making 3-5 injections around it.

This ensures a fairly high cost to try to get the active material to penetrate all the vascular systems and affect the tinder entirely. Very, very difficult case.

Have you detected a problem like this in your vine?

Welcome to The GardenPure! My name is Ryan Heagle, and I’m the founder of The GardenPure, I spent the first part of my adult life teaching and then living in Australia in various business ventures, the first of which was a business devoted to the sale of house plants.  I am now a full time blogger. I am a self taught gardener.

Ryan Heagle

Welcome to The GardenPure! My name is Ryan Heagle, and I’m the founder of The GardenPure, I spent the first part of my adult life teaching and then living in Australia in various business ventures, the first of which was a business devoted to the sale of house plants.  I am now a full time blogger. I am a self taught gardener.

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