Agrimonia eupatoria: characteristic and cultivation guide

Greetings to our regular readers. Today we are going to talk about a very common herb in the Iberian area, known as San Guillermo grass. We are going to tell you the family to which it belongs, all its characteristics, and even the medicinal properties and active principles it contains.

Do you know what Bach flowers are ? We tell you about it when we talk about  Agrimonia eupatoria . Enjoy it!

CULTIVATION, PROPERTIES AND CHARACTERISTICS OF AGRIMONIA EUPATORIA

One of the most important characteristics of  Agrimonia eupatoria  is the appreciation it has for its medicinal properties. These have already been known since ancient times, where King  Mithridates eupator  (who liked to use medicinal plants) took advantage of their essential oil extracted from the roots.

In fact, it belongs to Bach flowers or Bach flower remedies. Doesn’t it ring a bell? Then let’s catch up.

BACH FLOWERS AND AGRIMONIA EUPATORIA

This name refers to the creator of this group of plants: Edward Bach , a doctor of English origin who was born in 1886. He collected 38 artisan preparations where he extracted the water from the flowers to “obtain” properties. Something like current homeopathy.

Although such preparations had no pharmacological action (since the active ingredients were very diluted) is worth noting the importance of that is  Agrimonia Eupatoria  among these 38 flowers, all medicinal plants that exist, such as  Achillea ptarmica , for example.

HOW DO WE PHYSICALLY CLASSIFY ST. WILLIAM GRASS?

Agrimonia eupatoria is a herbaceous, perennial plant that belongs to the Rosaceae family . This family must sound a lot to you since the most famous fruit trees and plants (almond, strawberry, apricot, pear, peach, apple tree, etc.) belong to it. Ah well, if we had to name a quintessential ornamental within rosaceae, which one do you think we would say? Of course, the roses . You can take a look at his cultivation here .

CLIMATIC CHARACTERISTICS

It is very common to see Agrimonia eupatoria  growing spontaneously  in sunny areas of Spain (it is seen a lot in northern areas, such as Asturias, Cantabria, León, etc.). Climate temperate and warm , belonging to some parts of Europe and America.

It is common to see it grow around other crops, such as oak or holm oak. It can also be seen in slopes or rocky areas. Therefore, Agrimonia eupatoria  can be suitable for the rockery garden .

THE RIGHT SOIL FOR ITS CULTIVATION

We find a medicinal plant that does not have special growing conditions. It can grow in dry and poor areas, with a low content of organic matter. The pH is not a problem nor will it be necessary to modify it when planting  Agrimonia eupatoria. 

IRRIGATION

Agrimonia eupatoria can grow in warm environments where it is not watered frequently. It makes good use of soil moisture. However, some periodic watering, especially in warm seasons, if it is exposed to full sun, it will improve its development, to the point that it can reach one meter in height.

SUBSCRIBER

Although it grows together with other plants and even trees, it is capable of developing in poor and dry areas. The extra contribution of organic matter has a positive effect on it.

Often times, fertilizer is not made for St. William’s grass but for the plants that grow around it, so you can use it conveniently.

LEARN ABOUT ITS MEDICINAL PROPERTIES OF ST. WILLIAM’S WORT

Agrimonia eupatoria  is a herbaceous plant unknown to many, but surprising for all the medicinal properties it contains. There are also many legends surrounding this plant, such as that if you put a stalk of St. William’s wort on the head of someone who was sleeping, you deprived them of their memories.

Luckily, Agrimonia eupatoria   is a plant that has been widely studied by health authorities. On the one hand, the German medicinal plants therapeutic guide has approved use in the form of tea preparations to reduce throat inflammation (through gargling), as well as the control of diarrheal processes.

Its anti-inflammatory and healing properties are well known. There have also been clinical trials that support certain properties against gastrointestinal disorders, although the data offered by this medicinal plant are still being studied and consolidated. There are still things to discover about  Agrimonia eupatoria.

However, you must be careful with use because, although it has not been shown that there are problems with its use,  Agrimonia eupatoria  is still being subjected to studies in animals and humans.

There is a rating to see how it would rank in the face of scientific evidence. That something like:

  • Class A: consolidated scientific evidence for the study.
  • Class B: good scientific evidence.
  • Class C: doubtful scientific evidence.
  • Class D: acceptable scientific evidence of non-use.
  • Class E: Consolidated scientific evidence of non-use.

Class D and E does not mean that it is bad, but that it has no effect.

  • Gastrointestinal disorders: class C.
  • Skin disorders: class C.

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