How to water and fertilize tomato crops

The cultivation of tomato is not one of the simplest and influencing a lot of variables that can affect the health of the plant and the quality of the harvested fruit. To help, we created this article where we make a small summary of the main characteristics of irrigation and fertilization of a tomato with a conventional system.

When we talk about a conventional system, we mean that inorganic fertilizers are used that are not accepted in organic farming. However, as far as risks are concerned, they can be respected.

The amount of fertilizers that we will mention has to do with the recommendations to get the most out of a tomato, within its “genetic ceiling”

CHARACTERISTICS OF THE IRRIGATIONS IN TOMATO CULTIVATION

What is usually done in a generic way? Something quite simple, although conditioned by the climate where it is grown, the irrigation system, rainfall, etc.

  • Watering in autumn-winter: 2-3 times a week.
  • Watering in spring: 4-7 times a week.

Regarding the flow , on average a water contribution of 3L / plant is established. This would be to water 1 hour if we have a 3L / h dripper per plant, or 30 minutes if we had a 6 L / h dripper. Ultimately, it is a matter of doing simple calculations.

This as a general rule. Reading equipment and blood pressure monitors (here you can see the article on blood pressure monitors ) can help us decide whether, for example, in summer we will water 4 times a week or we will have to water every day (7 times a week).

For example, if we had a blood pressure monitor, many authors recommend watering before reaching 20-30 centibars.

FERTILIZER FOR TOMATO CULTIVATION IN DRIP IRRIGATION

An example of tomato fertilizer with inorganic fertilizers would be the following, divided by phenological phase of the crop.

1ST WEEK AFTER TRANSPLANTATION

Irrigation without fertilizer, maintaining constant humidity and providing water depending on the size of the plant.

2ND WEEK SINCE TRANSPLANT

  • 13-40-13 (0.5 kg / 1.000 m 2 ), o well
  • Monoammonium phosphate (0.5 kg / 1,000 m 2 )

3RD AND 4TH WEEK

  • Monoammonium phosphate (1 kg / 1,000 m 2 )
  • Potassium nitrate (0.5 kg / 1,000 m 2 )

FROM 4TH WEEK UNTIL THE START OF FRUIT SETTING OF THE 2ND BUNCH

1 watering

  • Nitric acid (0.2 L / 1,000 m 2 )
  • Calcium nitrate (1 kg / 1,000 m 2 )

2 irrigation

  • Monoammonium phosphate (1 kg / 1,000 m 2 )
  • Ammonium nitrate (0.5 kg / 1,000 m 2 )
  • Potassium nitrate (0.5 kg / 1,000 m 2 )

FROM THE 2ND BOUQUET UNTIL THE 4TH BOUQUET IS SET

1 watering

  • Nitric acid (0.2 L / 1,000 m 2 )
  • Calcium nitrate (1 kg / 1,000 m 2 )
  • Potassium nitrate (1 kg / 1,000 m 2 )

2 irrigation

  • Monoammonium phosphate (1 kg / 1,000 m 2 )
  • Ammonium nitrate (0.5 kg / 1,000 m 2 )
  • Potassium nitrate (1 kg / 1,000 m 2 )

FRUIT SET FROM 4TH BUNCH TO 7TH BUNCH

1 watering

  • Nitric acid (0.5 L / 1,000 m 2 )
  • Calcium nitrate (1.5 kg / 1,000 m 2 )
  • Potassium nitrate (1.5 kg / 1,000 m 2 )

2 irrigation

  • Monoammonium phosphate (1 kg / 1,000 m 2 )
  • Ammonium nitrate (1 kg / 1,000 m 2 )
  • Potassium nitrate (2 kg / 1,000 m 2 ) 

 FRUIT SET OF 7TH BOUQUET UNTIL THE END OF THE FRUIT SET

1 watering

  • Nitric acid (0.5 L / 1,000 m 2 )
  • Calcium nitrate (2 kg / 1,000 m 2 )
  • Potassium nitrate (3 kg / 1,000 m 2 )

2 irrigation

  • Monoammonium phosphate (0.5 kg / 1,000 m 2 )
  • Ammonium nitrate (2 kg / 1,000 m 2 )
  • Potassium nitrate (3 kg / 1,000 m 2 ) 

LAST FRUIT SET UNTIL THE END OF THE HARVEST

  • Potassium nitrate (2.5 kg / 1,000 m 2 )
  • Ammonium nitrate (2 kg / 1,000 m 2 )

ONE THING TO KEEP IN MIND …

You have to check the compatibility between the different products, in order not to create reactions that can clog droppers or form precipitates.

Guide on incompatibility between fertilizers

WELL, WHAT ABOUT THE MICROELEMENTS?

Of course, we do not forget about them. They are very important and if you push us to say it, we can say that they are decisive. These are the contribution recommendations according to authors such as ( Steiner or Sonneveld ).

  • Hierro (Fe): 2 ppm (mg/L)
  • Manganeso (Mn): 0.7 ppm (mg / L)
  • Copper (Cu): 0.02 ppm (mg / L)
  • Zinc (Zn): 0,09 ppm (mg/L)
  • Boro (B): 0,5 ppm (mg/L)
  • Molibdeno (Mo): 0.04 ppm (mg / L)

Iron chlorosis in lemon tree. Here more info

Now, we are talking about a pure product. That is, for iron it would be 2 mg / L if we bought an iron or iron chelate at 100%. Therefore, as this is not the case and they usually come with much lower percentages, you have to do the math.

A fairly common iron% (in chelated form) can be 7%. Then we would have to divide 2 mg / 0.07, which is equal to 28.57 mg / L of that iron at that concentration. If we add 1,000 L of water, that is 28 grams of iron for each cubic meter of water added. In general, for 180,000 L of water, 5 kg are provided.

 In any case, the origin of the raw material can be modified, obtaining the fertilizer units and the richness of each fertilizer. For example, monoammonium phosphate can be replaced by phosphoric acid plus the corresponding part of nitrogen.

Welcome to The GardenPure! My name is Ryan Heagle, and I’m the founder of The GardenPure, I spent the first part of my adult life teaching and then living in Australia in various business ventures, the first of which was a business devoted to the sale of house plants.  I am now a full time blogger. I am a self taught gardener.

Ryan Heagle

Welcome to The GardenPure! My name is Ryan Heagle, and I’m the founder of The GardenPure, I spent the first part of my adult life teaching and then living in Australia in various business ventures, the first of which was a business devoted to the sale of house plants.  I am now a full time blogger. I am a self taught gardener.

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